Top up the Christmas spirit

The festive season is a time when we strive to be generous and share the traditional Christmas spirit with those around us at work or at home. At Christmas, we show our respect or love for those in our lives with the custom of gift-giving. Not all gifts, however, need to come in boxes. We can also give the gift of being an open and honest communicator and listening well to what others have to say to us. Follow our three simple tips to make sure that you give meaningfully in your style of communication. 1. Speak from your heart:  When people hear what is coming from your heart, they can be moved to transcend the basic message and to grasp what you have to say with greater appreciation. 2. Make personal contact: There is a lot to be said for face-to-face communication, especially when there is so much emphasis these days on e-mail, social networking sites and text messages. Of course, any type of personal contact is better than none but a good old-fashioned conversation builds relationships, and breeds trust. 3. Listen with passion: Peter Drucker said that the most important thing in communication is hearing what isn’t said. Meaningful communication begins when you understand that the best gift you can give is to be a truly great listener. Why not adopt these good habits all year...

Learning from and with others

We Learn . . . 10% of what we read, 20% of what we hear, 30% of what we see , 50% of what we see and hear, 70% of what we discuss , 80% of what we experience , 95% of what we teach others. William Glasser The more interactively we learn, the better and more effective will be the learning that comes out of the process. In fact, we learn the most when we actively teach others how to do what we do. With Christmas is just around the corner, how can we relate learning to a tradition that is popular in some parts of the world – the cookie party? At a cookie party, everyone brings a few batches of cookies and then they are traded around. You leave the party with a tray full of different varieties of cookies – each type the speciality of someone else. What a great idea but it needs to be done just a bit differently if we want to learn how to bake those different types of cookies and not just taste them. With an interactive baking session, you could become involved in making cookies using someone else’s tips and methods and you could actually show someone how to reproduce those wonderful cookies you have been baking yourself for so many years. What would it be like if we could learn from and adopt the excellent communication patterns of others? How much more would we understand about our own communication style if we had to break down what we do well and teach it to others? Think of all...