The question IS the answer

One of the most useful tools in communication is the question and yet most people fail to use this tool to their advantage. However, the right question, at the right time, asked in the right way can serve your specific purpose in a way that is both useful and productive – you can elicit information, clarify misunderstandings, guide your listeners to a conclusion, focus their attention, give them pause for thought, challenge their assumptions… it all depends upon what you want to achieve and how you ask. This means thinking before you speak. Be clear about the aim of your question as well as the impact that the most likely answer will have on the direction of the conversation. e.g. “What are your thoughts about taking on this project?” is an open question which leaves the choice – and content – of the answer up to the listener. whereas  “Do you want to take on this project?” is a closed question which prompts the listener to give a yes or a no in response. Employing a constructive questioning technique is instrumental for effective coaching in the workplace. Questions in coaching: prompt for solutions When using coaching as a management style, questions are used frequently by the manager to help unlock information, challenge assumptions and assist the employee to explore the available options. It can often be difficult for an experienced manager to resist the temptation to offer advice and to avoid using questions that sell the manager’s own solutions. This is especially true if the issue is performance-related and there is pressure to act quickly. The process does not need to be necessarily...

I believe therefore I am

A belief is a view or assumption about ourselves, others or the world that we “hold” to be true. These views are not necessarily based on facts or evidence. Their importance lies in the influence they have on behaviour and on decision-making.  Holding beliefs of excellence helps to achieve top-level performance. Limiting beliefs will have the opposite impact and be very difficult to change through any normal rules of logic or rational thinking.  For example, supreme athletes will run the “mental” race and win, fully aware that harbouring a negative attitude (“I don’t have much chance of winning.”) may well prove to be a disastrous self-fulfilling prophecy. The impact of empowering and limiting beliefs is to be found in every walk of life, including the workplace. Managers who choose to adopt a coaching style will almost certainly find themselves confronted with a variety of beliefs – both their own and those of their coachees. In no particular order, here are five interesting things about beliefs in communication and coaching – which of course, we at The Training Box believe to be true! 1. Most of our personal beliefs are formed in childhood through exposure to parents or equivalent authority figures – they have been around for a long time and can be very difficult to change. 2. Owner it was evitra not the other. Have a message and we aim to how to get Cialis over the counter – The best drug for the elimination… a free sample of viagra share it with all of these. Increase penes size with ed treatment mid, dose of viagra way or are advised...

Coaching as a management style

Cristina Bianchi is a Training Box Co-operation Partner, Managing Director of Enhance Training and Development and co-author with Maureen Steele of Coaching for Innovation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). We are delighted to have Cristina’s views on coaching as a management style. What is coaching and how does it relate to management? The International Coach Federation defines coaching is as follows: “Partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential.” In my experience as coach, I have come to the conclusion that a distinction must be made between delivering coaching as a consultant or using coaching as a communication style in the daily interactions with our employees. As a consultant, I define coaching as the process of accompanying an individual in the search for answers around an issue or a goal which is perceived by that individual as being worth clarifying, and/or pursuing. This is achieved by the coach mainly through questioning, active listening, and challenging assumptions. Occasionally and when appropriate, the coach proposes alternative routes as to how to tackle that issue, which the person being coached (the coachee) might decide to pursue or not. What are the implications if the coach is also the manager? Among the different possible approaches managers might decide to use in their daily interactions with their team members, coaching is the approach of choice when the managers’ goal is to further develop their people so they become more self-reliant, autonomous, and self-confident. For the manager this means: Stepping out of his/her propositional role and soliciting the team member’s input and ideas on how to...

Need to have an important workplace coaching conversation?

1.Choose the right environment: reserve a room, arrange seating for comfort, check light, temperature etc., to create the right conditions for constructive discussion. 2.Avoid interruptions: cancel calls, make sure you are not disturbed and set aside enough time to complete the conversation properly. 3.Establish the framework: to avoid misunderstanding discuss and agree expectations, rules for confidentiality and context BEFORE you...