Give feedback effectively

What is feedback? The information given to an individual or a group about its prior behaviour and the consequent impact, so that the individual or group may adjust or reinforce its current and future behaviour to achieve a mutually agreed or desired result. There are many misconceptions about the practice of giving feedback. Some people see it as an opportunity to make a judgement about the other person or what they have done; they use it as a vehicle to tell them how to be something else or to do things in what they consider to be a better way. Very often feedback is only given when something goes wrong. To the contrary, feedback can and should be used as a tool to improve and maintain performance as part of an overall personal development process. The right kind of feedback can actually reinforce positive behaviour and actions, as well as draw attention to anything that is ineffective and that stands in the way of achieving good results. The fear of giving feedback is linked to a number of different issues: The practice of giving feedback is too often restricted to the annual performance review. This makes giving feedback more of an isolated event, separated by distance or time from the events to which it is related, and it is then approached with some trepidation by all parties. Replace this with the habit of offering regular and frequent feedback to those with whom you work.  Praise them for their accomplishments and achievements as well as making suggestions about how things could be done (or could have been done) differently. This...

Receiving feedback as a gift

Many people avoid feedback at all costs and view any review of their performance at work with fear and trepidation.  Whilst there is clearly a need for those who are tasked with giving feedback to develop their skills and competences in this area, the truth is that a lot of us simply fear what we perceive as criticism and all that this implies. There are many psychological reasons for this such as being worried about failure, denial of reality, concerns about accepting responsibility or the negative personal impact any consequences may have for us and our work. A number of things can support you on your journey to not only receiving feedback well when it is offered, but to ultimately seeking it out whenever possible. There is no failure – only feedback – Reframe how you think about feedback and view it as a learning and personal growth opportunity. Even if you performed a task to meet all expectations, there is nearly always something that could have been differently to come out in an even better place. Listen with an open mind – You are under no obligation to automatically agree with what the person giving you feedback is saying but don’t become defensive and automatically reject it. Repeat back what the other person has said – Paraphrasing what has been said allows to you time to digest the feedback and take it on board. It also shows that you have heard what the other person has to say. Stay focused on the facts – Not everyone is skillful at giving non-judgemental feedback. Remain aware of this and try...

Feedback as an opportunity for coaching

Prepare to step into a coaching role and switch from just telling to asking There is always likely to be some resistance to top-down solutions no matter how well-intentioned – and this is definitively one of the limitations of the STAR model. The approach of the STAR is essentially one of telling and this may have a negative impact on the engagement and potential creativity of the person receiving the feedback. Applying the model simply as written also leaves no space for the person being given the feedback to come up with their own suggestions. The result is to close the door to the exploration and integration of any more creative options that, after discussion and consideration, might lead to an even better outcome. We encourage you to make the switch from the traditional way of giving feedback to a process that permits you to step into a coaching role, using questions to nudge the person to whom you are giving feedback towards their own solutions and multiple options for moving forward. This means retaining the first phase of the traditional STAR model for feedback and then diverging to allow active participation in the process from both people. Here is an outline of the kind of conversation this would entail: STATE THE FACTS: objectively and non–judgementally, describe the Situation, the Task, the Action and the Result (impact). DEFINE A (NEW) MUTUALLY ACCEPTABLE OUTCOME: discuss and agree any essential revisions to the previously achieved Result. Sample coaching questions: “What would have been / be a better outcome?” “What is it that you / we would like to achieve now?”  ...